Air Quality 48 no4

Air Quality 48 no4

A$ 55.00

  • Observations of particulate matter concentrations from the Upper Hunter Air Quality Monitoring Network, NSW
  • Science and Perceptions of PM Problems in Newcastle, NSW Since the Closure of Heavy Industry
  • The relationship between industrial air pollution and social disadvantage in Australia: national and regional inequities
  • Investigating the health impacts of particulates associated with coal mining in the Hunter Valley
  • EPA management of air quality in the Hunter Region
  • Woodsmoke: Regulatory failure is damaging public health

Description

Presidents column

 

General Manager
Nick Koerbin

 

Branch Reports

 

List of Fellows and Accredited Professionals

 

Environment and Industry News

  • NSW EPA puts coal mines on notice for Windy Spring Conditions
  • NT EPA issues notice of Environmental audit to McArthur River mine
  • Global carbon dioxide emissions reached 36 billion tonnes in 2013
  • USEPA releases guidance to improve schools’ indoor air quality and energy efficiency USEPA announces rebate program to reduce diesel emissions from school buses New report recognises climate change and ozone depletion links
  • USA Fuel Economy reaches all-time high
  • USEPA releases greenhouse gas emissions data from large facilities
  • USEPA announces new actions to curb potent greenhouse gases
  • USEPA report shows progress in reducing urban air toxics across the US
  • Climate forcing f-gases
  • Europe’s climate continues to change
  • IPCC launches full working group II report
  • Ozone layer on track to recovery and findings at the bottom
  • Atmospheric superglue
  • Abundant natural gas may do little to reduce US emissions, study suggests
  • Satellite data shows US methane “hot spot” bigger than expected
  • Fiber optics in Antarctica will monitor ice sheet melting
  • Studyfinds air pollution harmful to young brains
  • South Korea to tighten car emissions control by 2020
  • Fall in monsoon rains driven by rise in air pollution
  • Key reaction for producing “atmosphere’s detergent” observed
  • Ozone pollution in India kills enough crops to feed 94 million in poverty
  • Cutting emissions pays for itself

 

Services to Air Quality in Victoria and Tasmania Recognised

 

Upcoming conferences and short courses

 

Technical Articles

A. Betts, U. Dutt, N. Jiang, L. Warren and S. Watt
Observations of particulate matter concentrations from the Upper Hunter Air Quality Monitoring Network, NSW
The Upper Hunter Valley region of New South Wales is a major coal mining area containing approximately 40 per cent of NSW’s currently identi ed total coal reserves. The region also has a significant agriculture industry and large electricity generation units. The Upper Hunter Air Quality Monitoring Network (UHAQMN) was established to provide the community with information about particulate matter (PM) levels in the region, to aid in identifying emission sources, and to inform regulatory programs to reduce emissions. This paper describes the network and presents observations of PM10 and PM2.5 from the network in the context of valley topography, meteorology and significant air quality events.

 

H. Bridgman and N. Cushing
Science and Perceptions of PM Problems in Newcastle, NSW Since the Closure of Heavy Industry.
Since closure of BHP Rod and Bar in late 1999, the former industrial city of Newcastle, NSW has a new economic and air quality lease on life. Residents enjoy cleaner air, and particle matter measurements (PM) at different size ranges (dust deposition, PM10, PM2.5) show greatly reduced concentrations. For the vast majority of the time, annual and daily PM10 and PM2.5 meet National Environmental Protection Measure standards or guidelines. However, concern about PM emissions from Coal Chain activities, associated with the world’s largest export port for coal, has created a perception of continuing air quality problems that could affect the health of residents.

 

J. Chakraborty and D. Green
The relationship between industrial air pollution and social disadvantage in Australia: national and regional inequities
This technical paper used rank correlation analysis to link the spatial distribution of sites and emissions associated with industrial pollution sources, derived from the National Pollution Inventory (NPI), to Indigenous status and socio-economic disadvantage characteristics of communities, derived from Australian Bureau of Statistics indicators.

 

CB Dalton, DN Durrheim, G Marks, CA Pope III
Investigating the health impacts of particulates associated with coal mining in the Hunter Valley
There have been many calls for epidemiological investigations into the potential health impacts of coal mining in the Hunter Valley. Epidemiological studies of air pollution and health are subject to potential confounding by other determinants of health outcomes. Furthermore, the effect sizes are generally quite small. Therefore, large and well-designed studies, with careful measurement of air pollution exposures, health outcomes and potential confounders are required to establish whether adverse health effects of the pollutant exposure do exist.

 

A. Morison and L. Graham
EPA management of air quality in the Hunter Region
The NSW Environment Protection Authority (EPA) is the state’s primary environmental regulator and works with businesses, government and community to manage pollution and reduce waste. This article considers the EPA’s overall regulatory and policy framework for managing air quality; the evidence base on which the EPA relies; and targeted management responses the EPA has developed and implemented in the Hunter region to reduce emissions from major sources and improve air quality and public health.

 

D L Robinson
Woodsmoke: Regulatory failure is damaging public health
Despite only 4.3% of households using wood as the main form of heating in 2008, over half of annual PM2.5 emissions in Sydney came from domestic wood-heaters, which were also identified as a major contributor to secondary particle formation. With average rewood consumptionof about 2 tonnes/year, the average brand new wood-heater emits about 20 kg PM2.5 and
has estimated health costs (using the NEPC economic analysis estimate of $280/kg for PM2.5 emissions in Sydney) of $5,600 per year.